Review of fundraising


In 2006, around 30,000 fundraisers were active on the Dutch market, according to Donor Union Holland. The fundraising market grew by 6% in 2006, to more than € 1 billion (figures for 2007 were not known at the time this report was printed). The bulk of this growth is caused by the increase in donations through legacies and bequests. This development did not have a large impact on War Child's income, because War Child supporters are relatively young. The growth in 2007 was for a large part caused by a larger number of steady private donors (Friends) and structural business sponsors.

Income
In 2007, War Child generated € 10,374,898 in income, a growth of 21% compared to 2006. The bulk of this income, 65%, was realised by War Child's own fundraising (private individuals and companies in The Netherlands). The remainder was generated by authorities and institutional donors (23%) and the National Postal Code Lottery (10%).


Table Income and expenditure War Child
 

Low costs
The hallmark of the Central Bureau for Fundraising stipulates that a recognised charity may devote a maximum of 25% of income to fundraising activities. With its percentage of 15% War Child is well below this limit. This is possible because of its large number of sponsors. The costs that War Child makes for fundraising are costs of salaries and the costs of raising funds (direct marketing through telephone and fundraising in the streets). War Child has not been able to find sponsors for this, because these businesses exist by working for charities. War Child has, however, been able to agree sharp tariffs fundraising guarantees. The investments can be recovered within a few months and will start bringing in a profit in the years after by bringing in structural donors.

 

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Aase Kretzschmar, War Child’s press officer

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